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Research Seminars: AMS/AWM

Fall 2022

Time & Location: All talks are on Wednesday at PM unless otherwise noted.
Organizer: Argentino, John V

Archives

 

Wednesday, September 12

Topic: We welcome Dr. Samuel Punshon-Smith

Samuel Punshon-Smith | Tulane University

Abstract: we welcome Dr. Samuel Punshon-Smith to discuss his research and highlight a woman in Mathematics of his choice. We will be providing refreshments, so please come by enjoy! Said refreshments have yet to be bought, so if you have input be sure to drop me a line.

Location: Gibson Hall 400- D
Time: 3:00

 

Wednesday, October 5

Topic: Smooth non-parametric coalescent priors for scalable divergence time estimations

Xiang Ji  | Tulane University

Abstract: Coalescent theory has become an essential model to infer past population dynamics in population genetics.  In the last two decades, there have been several non-parametric expansions of the coalescent model that allow parameter values to change over time.  The foundation of these model improvements is worked out by Dr. Tanja Stadler, a female mathematician at ETH Zurich.  In this talk, we will highlight some of Dr. Stadler’s work on coalescent theory and a specific non-parametric coalescent model named “Skygrid” model.  We discuss our recent work on divergence time estimations and the motivation of our new work direction in smoothing the coalescent priors in the non-parametric models.

Location: Gibson 126A
Time:4:00

 

Wednesday, October 12

Topic: Tropical Algebra and Geometry

Kalina Mincheva  | Tulane University

Abstract: Algebraic varieties are defined as the zeroes of polynomials with coefficients in a field (usually the complex numbers). Tropical varieties are combinatorial shadows of algebraic varieties. They can be described by tropical equations, obtained from the algebraic ones by changing the coefficients and the operations. The resulting algebra and geometry are very different from the classical ones. We will discuss various ways to understand and use tropical algebra. We will draw parallels with classical algebraic geometry. (No prior knowledge of either tropical or algebraic geometry will be necessary).

Location: Gibson 126A
Time:4:00

 

Wednesday, October 26

Topic: Spinning helices, heaving panels and waving tails: the role of flexibility in propulsion

Lisa J. Fauci | Tulane University

Abstract:

The observed gait of a swimmer arises from the interplay of internal force generation, the passive elastic properties of its body, and environmental features such as fluid viscosity, boundaries, and obstacles.  We will share some insights that we have gained using computational models of a few systems that range from the microscopic regime to vertebrates.   

We will have some tea and cookies. Please bring your reusable mug for tea.
 
You can find information about future talks on Tulane Math Graduate Student Chapters Homepage

Location: Gibson 126A
Time:4:15

 

Wednesday, November 9

Topic: What is an integrable system?

Victor H. Moll | Tulane University

Abstract:

The goal of this presentation is to describe, in general terms and without technical details, a possible answer to the question in the title. A first approach is this: a system is integrable if you can produce a closed-form to represent its solution. This was the main concerns of Classical Mechanics of the 19th century. Many ideas of Mathematics came from this solving this questions: Lie brackets, flows, symplectic geometry and many more. The subject fell out of popularity when Poincare showed that the interaction of three bodies is not integrable. Many decades later, in a surprising discovery, it was found that Korteweg-de Vries (one of the basic equations of waves) has properties that could be described as integrable. The subject then grew in unexpected directions. Connections with Algebraic Geometry were found in the 1970 and these days they are being used to study curves of infinite genus.
 
The talk will serve as a promotion of the course being taught in the Spring semester.
 
We will have some tea and cookies. Please bring your reusable mug for tea.
 
You can find information about future talks on Tulane Math Graduate Student Chapters Homepage
 
Hope to see you all there!

Location: Gibson 126A
Time:4:00

 

Wednesday, November 30

Topic: No title given

Tommaso Buvoli | Tulane University

Abstract:

Modeling complex physical systems requires efficient numerical methods that can accurately resolve a range of temporal and spatial scales. In this talk I will give an introduction to several types of time-integration methods that are used to solve stiff systems arising from the discretization of partial differential equations. In particular, I will give an overview of explicit, implicit, linearly implicit, and exponential integration methods. I will also introduce the parallel-in-time method Parareal and discuss how it can be applied to solve non-diffusive systems.

Location: Gibson 126A
Time:4:00